Gyounggeun Yoo (유 경근) and Kyunghee Yoon (윤경희), parents of two Danwan High School victims, pose for a portrait. Rather than using their own names, they prefer to be identified by those of their children: 'Yae-un appa' (Yae-un's father) and 'Shee-yeon omma' (Shee-yeon's mother). The shirts they wear – every day, without fail, throughout the trip – are imprinted with photographs of the daughter they each lost. Pinned at the top of the shirts is a carnation, a symbol for Parents' Day, which is celebrated in South Korea in May.
Gyounggeun Yoo (유 경근) and Kyunghee Yoon (윤경희), parents of two Danwan High School victims, pose for a portrait. Rather than using their own names, they prefer to be identified by those of their children: 'Yae-un appa' (Yae-un's father) and 'Shee-yeon omma' (Shee-yeon's mother). The shirts they wear – every day, without fail, throughout the trip – are imprinted with photographs of the daughter they each lost. Pinned at the top of the shirts is a carnation, a symbol for Parents' Day, which is celebrated in South Korea in May.
Day 1, Trafalgar Square, London: At the first, official event of the UK part of the trip, a protest in the centre of London, a new, hand-made banner is displayed. The item is a gift from Susan Lee, a Sewol supporter in Australia, to the  Remembering Sewol UK group that has been holding monthly protests in the British capital since April 16, 2014. The balloons in the top left corner contain the names of the nine individuals whose bodies still have not been recovered.
Day 1, Trafalgar Square, London: At the first, official event of the UK part of the trip, a protest in the centre of London, a new, hand-made banner is displayed. The item is a gift from Susan Lee, a Sewol supporter in Australia, to the Remembering Sewol UK group that has been holding monthly protests in the British capital since April 16, 2014. The balloons in the top left corner contain the names of the nine individuals whose bodies still have not been recovered.
BBC Broadcasting House, London: During a radio interview for the Outlook programme of the BBC World Service, the interpreter reaches out to Yae-un appa in a particularly emotional moment. The 10 minute interview is available here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03tnxqh (starts at around 13:18).
BBC Broadcasting House, London: During a radio interview for the Outlook programme of the BBC World Service, the interpreter reaches out to Yae-un appa in a particularly emotional moment. The 10 minute interview is available here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03tnxqh (starts at around 13:18).
Elephant & Castle, London: Volunteers from Remembering Sewol UK discuss plans at the AirBnB accommodation they have prepared for the visitors.
Elephant & Castle, London: Volunteers from Remembering Sewol UK discuss plans at the AirBnB accommodation they have prepared for the visitors.
School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS), London: In the evening, there is a film screening of the Newstapa documentary "Cruel Times, Lies of a Nation" ("참혹한 세월 , 국가의 거짓말"). When the electricity fails in the entire building in the middle of the post-screening panel discussion, audience members use their mobile phones to shine light on the speakers.
School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS), London: In the evening, there is a film screening of the Newstapa documentary "Cruel Times, Lies of a Nation" ("참혹한 세월 , 국가의 거짓말"). When the electricity fails in the entire building in the middle of the post-screening panel discussion, audience members use their mobile phones to shine light on the speakers.
SOAS, London: Supporters write messages on a banner for all the 4/16 Sewol Families members in Korea. The banner has been signed – in multiple languages – at all stops of the Sewol Families European tour.
SOAS, London: Supporters write messages on a banner for all the 4/16 Sewol Families members in Korea. The banner has been signed – in multiple languages – at all stops of the Sewol Families European tour.
Near SOAS, London: At a dinner in a Chinese restaurant, the group shares a moment of laughter. Happy moments like this occur again and again: while the cause that brought the Sewol families together is heart-breaking, a community of hope and fellowship spanning across the globe has also emerged from it.
Near SOAS, London: At a dinner in a Chinese restaurant, the group shares a moment of laughter. Happy moments like this occur again and again: while the cause that brought the Sewol families together is heart-breaking, a community of hope and fellowship spanning across the globe has also emerged from it.
Day 2: After days of a tightly packed schedule and little rest, Hyunju Park, who, as the most fluent English-speaker of the group, is often in charge of making sure that everything runs smoothly, catches up on sleep on the 5.30 am train from London Euston to Liverpool.
Day 2: After days of a tightly packed schedule and little rest, Hyunju Park, who, as the most fluent English-speaker of the group, is often in charge of making sure that everything runs smoothly, catches up on sleep on the 5.30 am train from London Euston to Liverpool.
QualitySolicitors Jackson Canter, Liverpool: The group meets with Barry Devonside and Jenni Hicks, parents of victims from the 1989 Hillsborough disaster at the QualitySolicitors Jackson Canter office. The meeting is in part possible as a few days prior to the Sewol group's arrival in Europe, an inquest jury has finally ruled that the 96 Hillsborough victims were "unlawfully killed".
QualitySolicitors Jackson Canter, Liverpool: The group meets with Barry Devonside and Jenni Hicks, parents of victims from the 1989 Hillsborough disaster at the QualitySolicitors Jackson Canter office. The meeting is in part possible as a few days prior to the Sewol group's arrival in Europe, an inquest jury has finally ruled that the 96 Hillsborough victims were "unlawfully killed".
As throughout the entire trip, the group receives both local  (BBC Radio, BBC North West, Echo) and Korean (Hankyoreh, JTBC) media coverage.
As throughout the entire trip, the group receives both local (BBC Radio, BBC North West, Echo) and Korean (Hankyoreh, JTBC) media coverage.
The Sewol and Hillsborough parents visit a memorial in the centre of Liverpool. Between them, they have lost five children: Shee-yeon Kim (17), Yae-un Yoo (17), Christopher Devonside (18), Victoria (15) and Sarah Hicks (19).
The Sewol and Hillsborough parents visit a memorial in the centre of Liverpool. Between them, they have lost five children: Shee-yeon Kim (17), Yae-un Yoo (17), Christopher Devonside (18), Victoria (15) and Sarah Hicks (19).
Anfield Stadium, Liverpool: An item at the second Hillsborough disaster memorial, at the home stadium of the Liverpool Football Club, bears the same "You'll never walk alone" message that is also sometimes used by Sewol campaigners.
Anfield Stadium, Liverpool: An item at the second Hillsborough disaster memorial, at the home stadium of the Liverpool Football Club, bears the same "You'll never walk alone" message that is also sometimes used by Sewol campaigners.
The group takes a smoke and mobile phone break.
The group takes a smoke and mobile phone break.
After their visit of the Hillsborough Memorial at Anfield Stadium, the Sewol parents buy gifts for loved ones back home in the Liverpool FC shop.
After their visit of the Hillsborough Memorial at Anfield Stadium, the Sewol parents buy gifts for loved ones back home in the Liverpool FC shop.
The group returns to the solicitors' office for more meetings for advice on how to proceed with their fight for justice.
The group returns to the solicitors' office for more meetings for advice on how to proceed with their fight for justice.
Shee-yeon omma is very animated during a one-on-one interview with a Hankyoreh reporter.
Shee-yeon omma is very animated during a one-on-one interview with a Hankyoreh reporter.
The Sewol group gifts a hand-made necklace and card to all the individuals they meet during their stay. The items contain flowers collected and dried by Sewol mothers.
The Sewol group gifts a hand-made necklace and card to all the individuals they meet during their stay. The items contain flowers collected and dried by Sewol mothers.
New Malden, London: Returning from the Liverpool daytrip, the Sewol Families members excitedly shop for ramyun in a Korean supermarket in New Malden, a suburb in southwest London which boasts one of the largest communities of Koreans – both economic migrants from the South and refugees from the North – in Europe.
New Malden, London: Returning from the Liverpool daytrip, the Sewol Families members excitedly shop for ramyun in a Korean supermarket in New Malden, a suburb in southwest London which boasts one of the largest communities of Koreans – both economic migrants from the South and refugees from the North – in Europe.
Unlike in South Korea, where some of the public has become tired of the Sewol campaigners, people in the UK – British-Koreans, other Londoners and tourists – are generally supportive and understanding. Voices of dissent do however arise at the last event of the trip in New Malden.
Unlike in South Korea, where some of the public has become tired of the Sewol campaigners, people in the UK – British-Koreans, other Londoners and tourists – are generally supportive and understanding. Voices of dissent do however arise at the last event of the trip in New Malden.